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What you should read First

What you should read Second.

Start with "Fibromyalgia Definition"and and then move on to the rest of the posts of dated April 24th

Friday, August 22, 2014

7 things people with anxiety want yo to know.

Found this on face book.


have anxiety, and I believe I can speak for everyone with anxiety when I say this: it’s gotta be hard to be close to us. But there are seven things we want you to know that we don’t always know how to tell you.

1. It doesn’t have to do with you.
It can be pretty exhausting ruminating about everything we possibly have done wrong, are doing wrong, or could do wrong. We may want to sit and cry sometimes. We may be uninterested in our activities. We may snap at you, even though you absolutely don’t deserve it. We may even get nervous that you don’t love us anymore, even if you’ve given us no indication of this.
We want you to know above all else that it doesn’t have to do with you. It’s not your fault. We love you, and we’re so, so sorry if we ever give the impression that we don’t. We just don’t love our brain right now, and we don’t know how to deal with it.

2. Never try to talk us out of our emotions.
Trying to relieve us of our fear or sadness might seem like a good idea. And sometimes, it is. In fact, we might even ask you if we have any reason to be worried, so that we can try to combat that irrational part of us that is constantly afraid.
But there’s a fine line between trying to help us and trying to talk us out of it. Never tell us that our worries don’t exist, or that we can get over it if we just stop thinking about it. All that does is make us feel like we’re broken—that there’s something wrong with us that even our closest loved ones don’t understand.

3. Part of us knows that our fears aren’t rational, but we can’t shake the part that doesn’t.
Sure, we know that the embarrassing thing we said wasn’t really all that embarrassing, and it probably didn’t influence anyone’s opinions of us whatsoever, and that the entire group we were with today probably isn’t talking about how terrible we are behind our backs. We know how ridiculous that sounds, and it sounds even more ridiculous saying it out loud.
But that other part of us. . .that’s where anxiety lives. That’s where it can stay, feeding on us, popping out its head occasionally to remind us that it’s still there. That’s the part that always reminds us, “What if this time, my worries are correct?”

4. We are grateful for what we have—and for you.
Often, anxious people are labeled as pessimists. And that’s actually quite understandable. We’re pretty talented at coming to the worst possible conclusion almost instantaneously.
But that’s not always who we are. In fact, many of us are pretty optimistic between anxiety bouts. We do love our life, and we are grateful for what we have, and we are especially grateful for you. We don’t mean to focus on the negative, but sometimes, we can’t help it. Know we always appreciate you. You are the light at the end of our tunnel. You are the one who tries your hardest to understand, who knows us in and out and still is willing to stay.

5. We know you can’t always see things from our perspective, but we appreciate you trying.
As someone who doesn’t suffer from anxiety, we know you won’t be able to fully understand. We know that we might sometimes sound crazy, and we’re sure it can be frustrating to have to drop everything and calm us down.
But every time you answer our fearful texts with reassurance and kindness, or pull us into another room to ask us what we’re worrying about, or are simply there, steady, supportive, without questioning the way we operate. . .we can’t even express how much that means, because it’s rare to find.

6. We wish we could turn it off, but we can’t.
Though it might seem otherwise, we don’t want to focus on what could go wrong. We don’t want to be negative, or bring the mood down, or nitpick about things that may seem little to an outsider. We’re not trying to get attention.
We know how we sound sometimes, and we wish we could turn it off. But it’s just a part of who we are.

7. It doesn’t define us.
We may have anxiety, and it may be a part of us. But so are our passions, our quirks, our personalities. Anxiety is one of countless parts. We still laugh. We still feel the wind in our hair. We still appreciate a steaming mug of coffee early in the morning, or the sun warming our skin in the summer.
We still love you. We always will.


Sammy Nickalls is a writer and the content manager of Inspiyr.com, an online magazine helping people get healthier, happier, and more successful. She is an avid health nut, as well as a lover of yoga, gaming, books, and tea.

Friday, February 21, 2014

Really? The Claim: Fibromyalgia Is Affected by Weather

THE FACTS
No one really knows precisely what causes the debilitating fatigue and muscle pain of fibromyalgia. But some people who have the disorder say they know what can make it worse: changes in the weather.
Cold, damp days and drops in barometric pressure are widely associated with flare-ups in symptoms of the condition, which affects mostly women. In one study by the National Fibromyalgia Association, people with the condition ranked weather changes as one of the leading aggravating influences on pain and stiffness.
Unlike the reported connection between arthritis and changes in temperature and pressure – which has mostly been debunked – the belief that fibromyalgia symptoms fluctuate with the weather has not been the subject of thorough research. The few studies that have investigated it have mostly found little evidence of a link.
In the latest report, published this month in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, Dutch researchers followed 333 middle-aged women who had fibromyalgia, looking for relationships between environmental conditions and their levels of pain and fatigue. Over the course of a month, the researchers monitored humidity levels, atmospheric pressure, precipitation, temperature and sunshine duration, using data from a meteorological institute.
In some cases, they did find that weather variables had “significant but small” effects on pain and fatigue. But for the most part, they concluded, there was “more evidence against than in support of a uniform influence of weather on daily pain and fatigue.”
THE BOTTOM LINE
Most studies have not found much evidence of a link between fibromyalgia symptoms and weather patterns.

However those of us who have it may disagree. 

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Smoking with Fibromyalgia

If you smoke and you have fibromyalgia, you may be hurting more than you have to.

I'm not going to preach at you to quit - I know that's just annoying and doesn't do any good - but I do want you to have the information you need to make informed decisions about your health. And we have mounting evidence showing that smoking and other tobacco use makes fibromyalgia symptoms worse.



Do you smoke cigarettes or chew tobacco?

When you have fibromyalgia, tobacco use may have even greater health risks than you thought.

Multiple studies have shown that tobacco use is associated with worse fibromyalgia symptoms. Smoking may also be a risk factor for developing this condition.

The Studies

In 2009, Mayo Clinic researchers published a study that included data from 984 patients, 145 of whom were tobacco users.
Researchers said tobacco use was linked to:
  • Greater pain intensity
  • Higher scores on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire
  • Fewer good days
  • More missed work
Also in 2009, a study published in Rheumatology International found that the following symptoms were more severe in cigarette smokers:
  • Chronic widespread pain severity
  • Unrestorative sleep
  • Paresthesia (odd nerve sensations)
  • Anxiety and depression
Those researchers compared smoking rates of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis patients and found that fibromyalgia patients were more likely to smoke.

A 2011 study involving 336 people with fibromyalgia found that about 10% of participants were current smokers. Researchers concluded that smokers:
  • Had more tender points
  • Were more likely to be depressed (women only)
The authors called for more research into the impact of smoking on pain, function, and psychiatric features in the illness.

A 2010 study suggested that smoking cigarettes appeared to be linked to the development of fibromyalgia, and that smoking may be a risk factor.

Trying to Quit


Go to one of my links about E-Cigs. as of 2/6/14 I have been smoke free for 3years 2 months and 6 days using an E-Cig. My pain decreased by at least 10%.